You do you.

The state of female sports broadcasting is a hot topic in the industry right now. Like anything in life, it can always be improved, but the best way to do that is for us women to continue to work hard and be true to ourselves. My advice: be yourself!

From the #MoreThanMean video to HBO’s recent Real Sports with Bryant Gumble episode, female sports journalists are giving a voice to the troubles that we encounter in a male dominated industry.

Like anyone, we have hurdles we face in our careers — especially because of our public positions and the state of social media. From pressures to look a certain way, to the rude, threatening and terrible comments made on social media — females are navigating the bad that can come with the jobs we love.

Last week a fellow University of Missouri Journalism graduate Jana Shortal was criticized a by a local newspaper for the pants she wore during a newscast while she reported on a tragic story of a missing Minnesota boy. Though this isn’t a sports example, I wanted to share because of Jana’s response to the situation. She stuck up for herself and has always stayed true to herself and her personal style.

Teryn got her start at the world renowned University of Missouri Journalism School and has since worked for the likes of FOX Sports, CBS Sports & now the PGA TOUR. Her bio...

Teryn got her start at the world renowned University of Missouri Journalism School and has since worked for the likes of FOX Sports, CBS Sports & now the PGA TOUR. Her bio…

So in an industry where you feel pressure to have thousands of followers on social media, where you may feel like you have to appease all the haters and look a certain way to get the job — my advise to you ladies, is to be yourself and to work your butt off. Because authenticity and hard work is what will make your on-camera presence shine.

I have people tell me all the time how they love that I’m so positive and that my smile lights up the broadcast — that’s because I love what I’m doing and am so happy to be talking golf everyday (who wouldn’t?!). That energy, that passion for my work, translates.

Therefore, women allowing themselves to be who they are, letting their passion exude through their work, while building each other up is what will allow us to thrive in the profession we love — and that’s what will inspire the next generation.

Before I saw in HBO’s piece that Laura Okmin was holding classes to train aspiring female sports broadcasters, I read a blog post by Alex Flanagan about how we should all be picking each other up and supporting one another in this industry. Both show that what we are all doing now will influence those that come after us.

The best thing we can do for them? You got it! Work your booty off and you do you 👊🏼

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